How I Open Sourced My Way to My Dream Job: Mohamed Said

Mohamed Said got his first computer at age 13—they were just becoming commonly accessible in Egypt—and started learning to code almost immediately. Flash was what drew him in, he says, with its animations and color and, well, “flashy” stuff.

Developers: Trash Your Resumes

Last week we wrote about whether a college degree is a necessity for a developer in today’s market. We came to the conclusion that what you can do is more important than how many framed diplomas you can hang on the wall, and the most important thing you can to do make yourself hireable as a developer is to code, early and often.

Do Developers Need College Degrees?

Do developers need college degrees? Just a generation ago, it was a given that a college degree was the best way to maximize the likelihood of securing a high-paying job in the field of your choice. But the world has changed, and more and more you hear of successful developers who never earned a degree, or college dropouts who made it big in Silicon Valley. Think pieces are published every day pondering the value of college, the skyrocketing rate of student loan debt, and whether or not the entire institution is just outdated and archaic.

Is an Early Stage Startup Right for You?

Chances are you’ve thought about going to work for a startup. If you’re in software, you’re surrounded by startup chatter. Who’s hot, who’s funded, who’s the next Twilio. Maybe you’ve fielded an offer or two from startups sure they’re about to be the next Silicon Valley unicorn. Or maybe you haven’t, but you’d like to. But a startup job is not just a job. The startup environment, especially in the early stages, is unique, and it takes a particular kind of personality to thrive in one.

There are incredible benefits to joining a startup, but there are also some downsides. Here are some of the key indicators that can help you decide whether an early stage startup is right for you.

Do You Code for a Living?

Not too long ago, developers were treated as nothing more than interchangeable assembly line workers or typists. Developers were supposed to just write some code and let everyone else do the “real thinking.” Stack Overflow was founded by programmers, for programmers, in part as a reaction to this backwards approach. We don’t think developers are typists. We think they’re doing something much more important. They’re writing the script of the future.*